Andreas Bested

Getting elevation


Thursday February 10th 2011 // Day 9

#01


By funneling the incoming air between two partitions the air should be accelerated through the construction. At the same time should any wind from the opposite direction be pushed over or to the sides, making the inner space change between calm and windy, thereby creating different experiences according to the direction of the wind.

Unfortunately the width of the funnel entrance or the angling of the walls did not seem to work,as most of the wind was pushed around.

#02


Testing the possibility of venting the ‘inside’ area by the means of forcing air in from the angled piece placed at the end of the construction (reversed in pictures) showed a major problem that should have been thought of; the vertical wall in front acts in the vertical plane just as in the horizontal plane were the wind is pressed far to the sides.
In the reversed test a small part of the wind was sucked under the angled piece, creating a small venting of the area.

Welcome to the (Wind)JungleTunnel


Wednesday February 9th 2011 // Day 8

#01

In this first experiment, I hoped to see how the smoke would fill up and create an air pocket in the same manner as when we did the testing with salt. This didn’t happen, probably due to low wind speeds. Instead the compression behind this spot is clearly visible. Also the vortex behind the angled partition can be seen.

#02

When rotated a small part of the smoke gets in between the partitions and clings to the angled partition while the rest is spread out to the sides by the perpendicular partition.

#03

When the wind is confronted with the first two partitions placed perpendicular to the wind, it is pushed to both sides and accelerated down the middle corridor. Here it meets with the second row of partitons, whereby a vortex is created in front of both as the wind i deaccelerated.

#04

In the second attempt the partitions have been rotated and are now too streamlined to have any really visible effects.

The end of the salt flats


Monday February 7th 2011 // Day 7

#01

In this setup we see the use of two effects seen before. On one side we have the small erosion by a partition moved out of the center of the wind blowing. At the same time we see a vortex creating behind the other partition in the front.

#02

Even though most of the wind is blowing through between the two sets of partitions, the erosion still happens along the inner edges.

#03

When directing the salt along angled blocks we again see the erosion happening faster on one side than the other, all the while the wind seems to stay lined to the partition. This is probably caused by a low pressure on the side with the faster wind.

#04

While trying to catch the salt in a small closure it became apparent that the wind had to be able to escape while the salt needed to be directed to the spot and then the velocity lowered.

Turbulence shows


Friday February 4th 2011 // Day 4

#01

In the two smallest distances turbulence can be seen as circular erosion in the salt between the partitions. When the distance is increased enough, these circles in the salt disappears and the more common pattern from the first experiments shows instead.

#02

When blowing the wind in between the two first partitions a suction is created at the inner edges, eroding the salt away here but leaving the center intact.

#03

For the third experiment the wind is directed downwards on the right side due to the partition parallel to the flow from the wind. This increases the removal of salt on the left side of the partition excessively.

#04

For the last of the four experiments an air pocket was created in front of the angled partition. This pushes the air forward again after overflowing the gap between the partitions and over the ‘top’ of the partition aligned to the flow of the dryer.

Pictures:

Test 01Test 02Test 03Test 04

Experimenting commences


Thursday February 3rd 2011 // Day 3

So, after having some troubles Live-tracing the movement patterns yesterday, we decided that we had to upgrade the ‘studio’ to prevent unwanted shadows in the pictures. After setting up tripod, lamp with indirect illuminating and movable reflector/screen, we got the last refinements on our setup in order. This included blocks to control the placement of the grid plane and directing the front to pint straight at our hair dryers flow of air.

Through the day we decided to experiment a bit in the placement of the partitions according to the diagram. We did this by moving the distance between the two partitions used all day. So for every experiment, we did three with different distance in between the elements.

#01

Version 01Version 02Version 03

As seen in the images, the short distance between the partitions in experiment 1 does not let the air flow back in before the placement of the second partition thus leaving it with out any changes. For the third experiment no changes are visible either, due to the distance from the hair dryer. Only in experiment 2 we see a small turbulent change in the salt at the corner of the partition, thereby giving evidence for a small wind blowing around the block.

#02

Version 01Version 02Version 03

In this test we really start to see how the wind reflecting off the partitions helps to guide the rest of the wind in a new direction. In the first experiment the wind from the first partition is being ‘sucked’ in behind the partition by the wind dividing on the second partition, where it loses some effect as also seen in the second experiment. Here the wind hitting the second partition and going in behind the first stays in a straight line since nothing is forcing in any other directions as we have seen the hair dryer do in earlier cases.

#03

Version 01Version 02Version 03

For the third test not much is happening, probably due to a low wind resistance.

Pictures:

Test 01Test 02Test 03Test 04

Hello world!


Wednesday February 2nd 2011 // Day 2

After having worked aerodynamic tests in a 2Dimensional plane (Salt on a grid) all day we discovered some imperfections in the manner the tests were carried out.

On of the toughest things were to try and get some symmetrical patterns on both sides of the partition. Usually because one of the sides ‘eroded’ faster than the other. In our attempts to control this, we discovered at least two factors affecting our problem. One was the direction of the wind from the hair dryer blower that wasn’t always straight. This of course made it difficult to determine the direction and hence made the patterns asymmetrical.
Another affecting force was the distribution of the salt on the plane. Even with all our efforts to smooth out the surface (Vibrating the plane with cell phones doesn’t have much effect) it wasn’t perfect every time, which made the salt disappear from certain places faster than others.
What did help the most was small notches forth and back in the corners of the plane as to make a bit of circular motion and thereby distributing the salt smoother all over the plane.

#01

The salt has been blown from both sides in an almost uniform pattern. Small irregularities derive from the non-perfect amounts of salt.

#02

By moving the partition out of the center of the wind, we change how the wind is moving around the partition. This increases the wind flow on one side and decreases on the side away from the wind.

#03

By changing the direction of the partition by 90 degrees, the pattern of erosion shrinks and the wind follows the sides of the partition.

#04

When moved out of the centre of the wind, the erosion subsides on both sides. Though the inner side expands past the outer due to more wind.

Anyways, here are the first (Motionpicture) results of today’s work:
Block placed in front of blowerBlock placed to the side of blower
Block aligned with direction of blowerBlock aligned with direction of blower but moved out of center

And some diagrams of the same tests:
Block placed in front of blowerBlock placed to the side of blower
Block aligned with direction of blowerBlock aligned with direction of blower but moved out of centre

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